k-mers are everywhere!

Many problems in bioinformatics involve working with short pieces of DNA sequence. We call these short words k-mers, where k is an integer usually less than 30 or so. A k-mer is essentially a substring of a larger sequence of DNA. If you’re  a biologist you may be wondering why people could be interested in anything other than 3-mers, the codons that encode amino acids. As it turns out, k-mers are at the center of many bioinformatics techniques and are the subject of intense algorithms research.

Some bioinformatics areas where k-mers play a central role:

  • Genome Assembly. Assemblers based on the overlap-consensus model (such as Celera) or De Bruijn Graphs (like Velvet) use k-mers to build the initial data structure for genome assembly. As overlaps between k-mers are found, the assembled sequence grows!
  • Sequence Alignment. The Basic Local Alignment Search Tool, or BLAST, is arguably the most well-known product of the bioinformatics field. BLAST can find DNA sequences conserved between organisms, uncover horizontal gene transfer and explain why we can’t make a vaccine for the common cold. And it all depends on the initial matching of short k-mers from the search sequence to the database.
  • Sequencing Quality Control. Overrepresentation of k-mers in a next gen sequencing library can be diagnostic for errors and duplications. The fastqc program computes the usage of 5-mers in sequencing reads as a form of quality control.
  • Alignment-Free sequence Analysis. My new favorite problem! Expect a post on this soon. Basically, the usage of short k-mers in a genome can be used to infer evolutionary relationships and examine horizontal gene transfer. Kind of like GC content but with more signal.
  • Codons and Repetitive Regions. Codons, the 3-letter sequences that encode for amino acids that build proteins, are essentially 3-mers with special biological function. 3-mers are also important in disease, such as the CAG repeats that cause Huntington’s disease.

K-mers are everywhere in bioinformatics. There is a lot of work into ways to efficiently (computational time and memory) count k-mers in large genomes. Really impressive and cool algorithms have been developed to solve the k-mer counting problem, some of which I’ll be talking about in a later post. It turns out these little words of DNA are important after all!

Posted in Algorithms, Bioinformatics.

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